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Course Listings

PHI105 Introduction to Logic (3)
Student will develop the skills needed for careful analytical reasoning and problem solving as well as practice assessing the reliability of evidence and testing the soundness and validity of various forms of argumentation. This course is particularly recommended for any student who anticipates the need to take one or other of the advanced tests for admission to graduate or professional programs. This course does NOT fulfill a core requirement.

PHI205 Philosophy of Human Nature (3)
A course focusing on the animate world around us and its reality as living, the difference between the living and the merely physio chemical, the human body as living, the difference between vegetative life and animal life; the human being as animal and evolution and ecology. Other topics will include the difference between the human being and other animals, thought versus sensation, choice versus instinct, the question of the human soul, its reality and immortality; the unity of the human person, the power to decide and the question of human freedom and human reason and its implications.

PHI215A Applied Ethics (3)
Students will explore ethical principles and major theories as well as application to various areas of human endeavor. The specific area of application will be designated in the course listings for a particular semester.

PHI215B Applied Ethics (3)
Students will explore ethical principles and major theories as well as application to various areas of human endeavor. The specific area of application will be designated in the course listings for a particular semester.

PHI215C Business/Professional Ethics (3)
Students will explore ethical principles and major theories as well as application to various areas of human endeavor. The specific area of application will be designated in the course listings for a particular semester.

PHI215D Ethics and Technology (3)
Students will explore ethical principles and major theories as well as application to various areas of human endeavor. The specific area of application will be designated in the course listings for a particular semester.

PHI220 Philosophy of Education (3)
A course that will focus on the epistemological underpinnings of important theories of knowledge and learning in the history of ideas; it will also examine the formation of schools and institutions of higher learning, and the social, political and economic functions that these institutions serve.

PHI225 Philosophy of Science (3)
Topics of this course will include the world around us in its physio-chemical, material reality; the world of energy, force, position, space and time, the world as changing and the universe of empirical research and its limits.

PHI230 Aesthetics (3)
A course covering art and literature as beauty, expression and communication, the reality of beauty, the objectivity and subjectivity of art and literature, beauty and truth and beauty and value.

PHI235 Social and Political Philosophy (3)
An examination of the interdependence of human beings and the reality of society, the person's relations to others in society and the question of authority and the freedom of the members of society.

PHI255 Special Topics in Philosophy (3)
Special topics courses are offered periodically for topics not included in the established curriculum.

PHI255A Special Topics in Philosophy Metaphysics and Epistemology (3)
Special topics courses are offered periodically not included in the established curriculum. PHI 255A only fulfills the core for metaphysics and epistemology.

PHI255B Special Topics in Philosophy Values and Ethics (3)
Special topics courses are offered periodically not included in the established curriculum. PHI 255B fulfills the core for values and ethics.

PHI307 Major Philosophical Authors (3)
A course exploring in-depth the writings of an author selected by the professor. Students will be expected to read closely, reflect critically and write in a clear, professional manner about the issues raised by the work of the author. This course may be repeated.

PHI325 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3)
An overview of western Philosophy from its beginnings to the Renaissance with special emphasis on a selected few of the more important Philosophers.

PHI327 Philosophy of History (3)
A course covering history and changing human relations, the question of history as development, progress versus mere change, learning from history and judging history and the freedom or determinism of history.

PHI330 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy (3)
An overview of western Philosophy from the Renaissance to the present, with special emphasis on a selected few of the more important philosophers.

PHI337 Philosophy of Religion (3)
Topics covered in this course will include the rationality of belief in God, arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of God as revealed by the evidence for saying the He exists, God's relation to the world He created and the relation of this investigation to religions.

PHI400 Baccalaureate Research Project (3)
Candidates for the baccalaureate degree are required to submit a research project consisting of three 12 to 15 page papers, typically connected by a central theme, issue or topic selected by the student and prepared under the guidance of a member of the Department. This project is intended to assure that the student acquires familiarity with the bibliographic, research and writing skills appropriate to the field of Philosophy. Ordinarily the student begins this project in the fall term of the academic year in which the degree is expected to be conferred; the final version of the research project is to be submitted no later than April 1 for evaluation by the mentor ad a second reader. Any modifications requested are to be completed before a final grade is assigned. A public oral presentation of the results of the research is arranged after the final version has been approved.

PHI401 Metaphysics (3)
An examination of the reality, or being, of the things around us, what can be said of anything insofar as it is real, the contingency of the realities around us, their finiteness and its implications, the infinite and their creature hood, change, being and becoming.

PHI417 The Realm of Values (3)
Nature, sources and types of values will be studied. Attention will be given to the major theories of value that have been proposed as well as to important issues such as the objectivity or subjectivity of values, the connection between value and ethical judgment, the role of values in elaborating systems of norms. Aesthetic, economic, intellectual, social and religious values will be examined in an effort to grasp the underlying relations among them.

PHI455 Readings in Philosophy Special Topics (3)
Students will discuss selected readings in an area or period of Philosophy directed, explained and guided by the instructor as arranged between the instructor and the student.